Recently, a massive #recall of 36 Million pounds of #Turkey, which was followed by a 36,000 pound #recall of beef, drew attention to the fact that acting quickly in #recalling a product can save lives and limit the scope of damage done by contaminated product.
Reports relating to the #recalls of #Cargill’s ground turkey have revealed the fact that concerns were first raised about #Salmonella as early as March 2011. By the time the turkey was openly #recalled it was reported that the strain of #salmonella, #Heidelberg #Salmonella, was resistant to first line defenses and antibiotics. Several deaths have been linked to this recall with nearly 100 falling ill during close to half of 2011.
In contrast, a recent recall of ground beef, predominantly in the Southeastern US, involved 36, 000 pounds and #e-coli. That recall was announced on a Friday and was slowly picked up by news media outlets over the weekend. In my opinion, it was underreported regardless of scope given it came on the heels of the deadly turkey recall that proved to be a pandemic even in the US. Some remain unaware of either recall even today.
Both recalls have drawn attention to the need for improved reporting and monitoring. Another growing concern, as outlined in the NPR Blog story (pictured above) focuses on the fact that antibiotics are used to feed poultry and may contribute to antibiotic resistant strains of food borne illness. Wonder if we will see more ‘Super’ versions of food born Salmonella or E-Coli? It is certainly possible if the lessons of August 2011 are left unchecked. How governmental regulatory authorities will modify, if at all,  existing regulatory monitoring remains unclear. However, this summer demonstrates that a potential need does exist and the ongoing debate is justified because lives are at stake.

Recently, a massive #recall of 36 Million pounds of #Turkey, which was followed by a 36,000 pound #recall of beef, drew attention to the fact that acting quickly in #recalling a product can save lives and limit the scope of damage done by contaminated product.

Reports relating to the #recalls of #Cargill’s ground turkey have revealed the fact that concerns were first raised about #Salmonella as early as March 2011. By the time the turkey was openly #recalled it was reported that the strain of #salmonella, #Heidelberg #Salmonella, was resistant to first line defenses and antibiotics. Several deaths have been linked to this recall with nearly 100 falling ill during close to half of 2011.

In contrast, a recent recall of ground beef, predominantly in the Southeastern US, involved 36, 000 pounds and #e-coli. That recall was announced on a Friday and was slowly picked up by news media outlets over the weekend. In my opinion, it was underreported regardless of scope given it came on the heels of the deadly turkey recall that proved to be a pandemic even in the US. Some remain unaware of either recall even today.

Both recalls have drawn attention to the need for improved reporting and monitoring. Another growing concern, as outlined in the NPR Blog story¬†(pictured above)¬†focuses on the fact that antibiotics are used to feed poultry and may contribute to antibiotic resistant strains of food borne illness. Wonder if we will see more ‘Super’ versions of food born Salmonella or E-Coli? It is certainly possible if the lessons of August 2011 are left unchecked. How governmental regulatory authorities will modify, if at all, ¬†existing regulatory monitoring remains unclear. However, this summer demonstrates that a potential need does exist and the ongoing debate is justified because lives are at stake.